Friday, January 17, 2014

Corn on the cob

Does anyone know who Heckle and Jeckle are anymore? Whenever I think of eating corn on the cob, I think of Heckle and Jeckle pecking away at it type-writer style. That's how fast I've been writing this week!

I wrote about 5,000 words for Sister Soul. It's a bit of a vomit draft in some areas, as I'm just getting scenes in the right places as fast as I can. But, so far, I don't see any major missteps, so it will just be a matter of fleshing things out in the next draft.

I'm wrestling to keep from being formulaic. As the girls discover their powers and try them out for the first time, I'm trying to avoid repeating similar types of scenes I've seen in the past.

I'm proud to say that I haven't been making things very easy for my characters. As I transition from one conflict to another, I'm getting better at not dropping the tension. I'm avoiding down time between obstacles by overlapping the obstacles.

The characters are also becoming clearer to me. One challenge of writing about two sisters who spend a lot of time together is that they start to become interchangeable. But I'm trying to define major needs that they both have that are different. At first they both missed their mother. Now, only one misses the mother. The other will have a different need that hasn't been defined in my head yet.

What's Peanut eating? He stole a big lump of soft cheese off the coffee table at our last dinner party. 

8 comments:

  1. "One challenge of writing about two sisters who spend a lot of time together is that they start to become interchangeable."

    Mona in the Desert has two sisters who spend a lot of time together. They are very much alike, but I have tried to differentiate them by...wait, what did I do? Mona is willing to take risks; Olive is more rule-bound and cautious. They are both unhappy in different ways, and have radically differing self images. I think that's the main thing that separates them: how they see themselves.

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    1. When I first started writing, the sisters were different in that Maria was a bit meaner, direct, and self-centered. Lynn was more of the caring giver. That came out in moments. But deciding on their different major needs has helped me because now they have different motivations, and those motivations lead to different actions. I have a challenge because in the first two thirds of the book, they share the same soul, in a way, so I need to balance that idea with some parallels between them.

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  2. Cybersister souls. I see.

    Well, my two sisters were easier to write, because I have two real women to base them on.

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    1. My two sisters are real. I unfortunately don't know them that deeply. One is my sister-in-law. The other is her sister. But I don't know there deep dark secrets. I have to make that stuff up, for better or for worse!

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  3. Sounds like a proper dinner party!

    I like that you say "overlapping obstacles". That's truly a wonderful way to keep tension going.

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    1. Thanks, Michelle. This relates to me just trying to be more real in the book too. Instead of problems quickly and easily getting resolved, I keep the remnants of each earlier problem, and the characters have to carry those remnants into the next scene.

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  4. People think I'm crazy
    They always try to waste me
    Make me burn the candle right down--
    But baby--baby--
    Don't need two jewels in my crown

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