Friday, January 10, 2014

Compressed sushi made by amateurs

I was in Washington D.C. for most of the week for work. Because of the cold, I stayed indoors in the evenings and was quite productive in my writing, reading, and the third "R" exercise.

Also, I spent a great deal of time working on Sister Soul, which feels like it has crossed over from the "Tentative Projects" list to the "Yes, I'm going to finish it!" list. I've got about 15,000 words written, but, more importantly, I can envision many more scenes. When I sit down to work on this, the words come out quickly. I have a better sense of the characters and the plot. I just need to get it down.

Over the last couple of weeks, I made some changes that I'm excited about.

First, I compressed some real-life events into a shorter period of time, and that has injected more heated emotions into the story.

Second, along with a scene in the Santa Anita "assembly center," I'm including a scene in 13th Century Japan that will include samurai and ninjas.

Third, I made a change among two of the characters that I'm excited about. Originally, they were this old pair that new everything and were just waiting for the right moment to tell the main characters. Now, they only know somethings, but they are trying to convince the main characters that they know everything. This pair feels much more complex to me, and I like that they are hiding this bit problem that will lead to complications later.

I'm currently stalled on a long monolog that I don't want to be a long monolog.

I also read The Family Fang, which is a very decent novel that made me laugh a lot because of phrases like "They spent their evenings sharing medicine."

What's Peanut eating? Tender blades of grass.




9 comments:

  1. Happy Holidays! I feel as if I haven't talked to you forever. Which is probably true. I hope you had a great one. Also, did I know you were on the east coast? Perhaps someday we may meet.

    It's so nice when a novel moves into the "yes I can finish it" category. I just hit 40k on my latest Regency, after tearing it down and building back up 3 different times. You'd think I'd know the formula by now. Ha.

    The thing I've learned over the last couple of books is I'm not a formula writer. Which makes writing just a little harder for me. The other thing I've learned just recently, is that real life moments inserted into any manuscript make it so much better.

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    1. Hi Robynne Rand,

      I will most likely be making more trips to the east coast. I figured DC was still too far away from you to try and visit, but I would have loved to meet you in person!

      I've always felt that writing gets better when there is some essence of reality to it. I think the experience makes itself present on the page somehow. When I write something that I want to be emotional, I always dig into my own experiences to try and let my body feel a real emotion that would be appropriate for the fictional situation I'm describing.

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  2. Samurai and Ninja's; can't go wrong there! I've had a few of those "I can, I can" moments myself. You'll get there Davin. You have completed many other works, and they are awesome.

    I'm glad to hear you had some fun, and writing productivity. The cold does have its uses :)

    .......dhole

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    1. Thanks, Donna! I've been chugging away on this book. It's nice to actually feel like I've got the ideas in my head and just need to get them out!

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  3. NINJAS! That's cool, Davin. I also love the idea of the couple who know some things and try to convince everyone they know everything. That sounds ... well, like some people I know in real life, and it makes me smile and nod my head. I'm so excited you're getting this project to a doable, happy space that will let it come to light for sharing. :)

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    1. I felt the same way about the couple, Michelle. When I came up with the idea, it felt real and complicated, and I loved it. BTW, I am reading Catch! It's great!

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  4. I am excited by your excitement! I like the idea of the old characters trying to convince people that they know everything. Do they think they know everything? Not knowing stuff is great fodder for fiction, I think. MONA IN THE DESERT is all about not knowing stuff, and how to go forward knowing you are ignorant. I hope all this work on your part means that Michelle and I will have some new Malasard to read soon. You and Michelle, by the way, will have a new Patience Quince novel in your hands very soon. Well, in a couple of weeks, but this time I mean it.

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    1. Scott, the characters know they don't know everything, but they're hiding it. They are actually role playing to keep the bad guys from knowing that someone is already dead. And they are also pretending to know everything to keep the heroins from losing faith in them. Great fun!

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